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Tree & Shrub Information

Land & Water Conservation

each tree or shrub individually

Evergreen Conifers

Planting:
Before planting, amend the soil with a good amount of organic matter such as compost, peat moss, or well-rotted manure. Mix this organic matter thoroughly with the planting-hole soil. Place the evergreen at the same depth it was growing in the container or burlap wrap. Bare-root plants should be planted so that the crown is level with the ground. Newly planted evergreens should not need additional fertilizer, but it is a good idea to surround them with a 2 to 4 inch layer of organic mulch, such as wood chips, shredded bark, or pine needles. Replenish the mulch as needed throughout the growing season.

Care:
The first two or three years after planting, make sure the soil is evenly moist from spring until the ground freezes in fall. Once established, many evergreens can tolerate some dry periods, but don’t hesitate to water as needed, especially in sandy soils. Always saturate the soil thoroughly with each watering to encourage deep rooting. To avoid brown needles in the winter, make sure the plants have plenty of moisture right up until the ground freezes.

Maintenance needs of evergreens differ depending on the species. Most shrubs will benefit from regular trimming to help maintain their natural shape. Do not cut branches too far back — stay in young green growth. Remove any dead, damaged, or diseased parts of evergreens at any time of the year.

Source: Landscaping with Native Plants of Wisconsin by: Lynn M. Steiner

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Deciduous Shrubs

Planting:

Deciduous shrubs are best planted in spring, but early fall is also a good time. If you have the opportunity to move a native tree or shrub, more it in early spring. Bare-root plants must be planted in early spring as soon as the soil can be worked. Container plants can be planted any time but the hottest days of summer, during July and August; spring planting is still the best, however.
Before planting, amend the soil with a good amount of organic matter such as compost, peat moss, or well rotted manure. Mix this organic matter thoroughly with the planting– hole soil. Place the shrub at the same depth it was growing in the container. Bare-root plants should be planted so that the crown is level with the ground. Newly planted shrubs should not need additional fertilizer. It is a good idea to surround all newly planted woody plants with a ring of organic mulch 2-4 inches thick. Good mulches are wood chips, shredded bark, and pine needles. Replenish the mulch as needed throughout the growing season.

Care:
The first two or three years after planting, make sure the soil is evenly moist, from spring until the ground freezes in fall. Once established, many shrubs can tolerate some dry periods, but don’t hesitate to water as needed, especially in sandy soils. Always saturate the soil thoroughly  with each watering. Most woody plants will benefit from a spring application of fertilizer. Spread a layer of rotted manure or compost around each plant or use Milorganite or fish emulsion. If possible allow leaves to fall and decay under shrubs to return nutrients to the soil. Keeps weeds pulled or smother them with organic mulch. Do not use rock or black plastic as mulch.

Best Native Deciduous Shrubs for Landscape Use:

Serviceberries, New Jersey Tea, Dogwoods, Leatherwood, Winterberry, Ninebark, Shrubby Cinquefoil, Canada Plum, Hop Tree, Bladdernut, and Viburnums

Source: Landscaping with Native Plants of WIsconsin by: Lynn M. Steiner






























CLICK HERE FOR PHOTOS AND INFO ON EACH TREE OR SHRUB INDIVIDUALLY

Deciduous Trees

Planting:

You will have the best success planting locally grown nursery trees that have been properly root pruned. They will survive transplanting the best and start growing quickly. If you have the opportunity to move a native tree, stick with one that is 1 or 2 inches in diameter or less, and move it in the early spring. Bare-root trees must be planted in spring as soon as the soil can be worked. Balled-and-burlapped, container-grown, and tree-spade trees can be planted any time but the hottest days of summer, during July and August. Spring is still the best time or planting, however.
Before planting, amend the soil with a good amount of organic matter, such as compost, peat moss, or well-rotted manure. Mix this organic matter thoroughly with the planting-hole soil. Place the tree at the same depth it was growing at in the container or the burlap wrap. Bare-root trees should be planted so that the crown is level with the ground level. Newly planted trees should not need additional fertilizer. Do not stake them unless they are on an extremely windy, open site. Any stakes should be removed as soon as the tree has rooted well, usually after the first year. It is a good idea to surround all newly planted trees with a ring of organic mulch 2-4 inches thick. Good mulches include wood chips, shredded bar, and pine needles. Replenish the much as needed throughout the growing season. Do not use rock or black plastic as mulch.

Care:

The first two or three years after planting, make sure the soil is evenly moist, from spring until the ground freezes in fall. Once established, most trees can tolerate some dry periods, but don’t hesitate to water as needed, especially in sandy soils. Always saturate the soil thoroughly  with each watering to encourage deep rooting. Most young trees will also benefit from a spring application of fertilizer. Spread a layer of rotted manure or compost around each tree or use fertilizer such as;  Milorganite or fish emulsion. If possible allow leaves to fall and decay under trees to return nutrients to the soil. Keeps weeds pulled or smother them with organic mulch.

Best Native Deciduous Trees for Landscape Use:
Maples, River Birch, Blue Beech, Hackberry, Kentucky Coffee Tree, Black Gum, Ironwood, Hop Hornbeam, Oaks, Basswood

Source: Landscaping with Native Plants of Wisconsin by: Lynn M. Steiner


































CLICK HERE FOR PHOTOS AND INFO ON EACH TREE OR SHRUB INDIVIDUALLY